Humans of Chicago: Wayne Cauthen

Humans of Chicago: Wayne Cauthen

Let’s judge our being one of the top cities in the world by how many people in our city are not helpless, how much of our population doesn’t need drastic help, and how many people have food within walking distance. If we could do that, I think we would be one of the top cities in the world.

CSAC Member Highlight: Swati Goyal

CSAC Member Highlight: Swati Goyal

How do we continue to address and involve the Latinx community, the African American community and also involve the immigrant populations, the migrant populations, the refugee populations, and the variety of Asian populations that exist in the city of Chicago and Illinois?

C3EN Team Member Highlight: Molly Martin

C3EN Team Member Highlight: Molly Martin

When I started my career, community-based participatory research was new, and my mentors were concerned that my research approach with community partners would not work. But it did! Together with my community partners, we generated useful research results that influenced programs, policies, and lives.

Happy New Year from C3EN!

Happy New Year from C3EN!

Happy New Year from the Chicago Chronic Condition Equity Network! As we enter our third year as a center, we celebrate the process of sharing knowledge and working together as a diverse and growing body of researchers and community-based organizations. 

NIH Funds C3EN Research: Activity and Recreation in Communities for Health (ARCH)

NIH Funds C3EN Research: Activity and Recreation in Communities for Health (ARCH)

C3EN is delighted to announce that Activity and Recreation in Communities for Health (ARCH), led by Brad Appelhans, Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine at Rush University Medical Center and C3EN Investigator Development Core co-director, in partnership with Paris Thomas, executive director of Equal Hope, a Chicago not-for-profit organization focused on eliminating health inequities, has received funding from NIH to study a novel approach to reducing depressive symptoms and lowering cardiometabolic risk.

C3EN Team Member Highlight: Marshall Chin

C3EN Team Member Highlight: Marshall Chin

There’s a variety of reasons why Asian Americans have been too invisible. Some of it is that the data are not collected or, or that granular data that divides Asians across different subgroups often are not collected. Some of it is being treated as the other, always being a perpetual foreigner, or even as the model minority myth—it’s another way of making invisible the heterogeneity within the Asian population.